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Thread: Round 1 in the Local park scene

  1. #11

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    this raises a question for me
    i don't fish as much fresh water as i used to
    simply do to the fact
    for me catching or targeting stocked fish was never the same as catching wild stock

    California was always weak for native game fishing diversity

    so the ocean always was a more attractive alternate for me

    not talking about offshore only but the surf or piers

    any feelings on this

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by capoisok View Post
    this raises a question for me
    i don't fish as much fresh water as i used to
    simply do to the fact
    for me catching or targeting stocked fish was never the same as catching wild stock

    California was always weak for native game fishing diversity

    so the ocean always was a more attractive alternate for me

    not talking about offshore only but the surf or piers

    any feelings on this

    I'll fish the stocker trout if I have an itch, and they stock either of the 3 parks that are within a 5 minute drive for me. But to actually chase stockers where I have to drive further than 5 minutes, it's not happening.

    And, California doesn't really have too much funding to maintain any type of quality freshwater native species thriving, so it's pretty much up to the species to survive. You'll see a few programs here and there that 'assist' in habitat enrichment, but it's a drop in the bucket in comparison to the rapid depletion that is occuring in our fisheries.

    I actually picked up a saltwater enhancement stamp this year, so i'll be venturing out into the salt it seems. Not really too keen on cattle boats, and I don't know anybody that i like that has a saltwater capable boat, so it'll be the surf, and jetties for me. Perhaps rent a boat at Newport for $200 . Plus, I don't really have any gear that is geared towards salt. I have an old AVET and use my Calcutta 400s if I ever do get out on a cattle boat.

  3. #13

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    not going to argue with you a crappy day of fishing is better than almost anything short of going to the race track

    and easy and close can't be replaced as a motivating factor

    plenty of good freshwater fishing in the state, though not even close to what it once was

    but within a few hours from anywhere in socal you have a shot at catching a spawning world record largemouth in early spring

    plenty of non planted trout options or that elusive #20 steelhead that i have never caught

    epic whisker fishing numerous places between here and the river
    secret spots, ponds irrigation canals lots

    and all you need is a 30lb rig a coleman lantern and a beach chair




    that 200 buys a lot of gas and grub especially if a couple of people split it up

    but as i said
    easy for me was 5 minute walk kneed deep in the surf

    any pidally wild fish to me was always cooler than a 10lb cardboard trout
    just my take

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Location
    Arcadia
    Posts
    91

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    Quote Originally Posted by etucker1959 View Post
    They were dead but stocked any way! Lol
    You saw them stock dead fish!!!???

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by FISHISH View Post
    You saw them stock dead fish!!!???


  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Location
    Arcadia
    Posts
    91

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by capoisok View Post
    this raises a question for me
    i don't fish as much fresh water as i used to
    simply do to the fact
    for me catching or targeting stocked fish was never the same as catching wild stock

    California was always weak for native game fishing diversity

    so the ocean always was a more attractive alternate for me

    not talking about offshore only but the surf or piers

    any feelings on this
    aw man. I was getting pretty good with those stocker trout!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Pomona (Ganesha Hills)
    Posts
    32

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    Many years ago on behalf of Trout Unlimited I filed a CEQA action against CDFW arguing that catchable-sized hatchery trout were biological time bombs in moving waters because of, at that time, whirling disease and the behavioral actions of fish raised in the confines a hatchery. We had 5 PhD’s in fishery biology as expert witnesses who explained the problems with hatcheries. The CDFW countered with the hatchery supervisors from the 5 inland districts.

    1. In order to maximize the mass production of trout that grow quickly to 9” -11”, the rainbow trout raised CDFW are virtually biological clones. Once a virus or bacteria enter the system, it affects all of the fish because of their common genetics. The lack the genetic diversity means that, like this year, every disease is a pandemic.
    2. There is a very low catch rate for trout planted in moving water and wild trout generally abandon areas planted with hatchery fish. The reason is that wild trout have developed a ritual for dominance that is disrupted by the chaotic, impulsive behavior of hatchery fish. Think Hell’s Angels meet a yoga class. We had a study done and when you amortize hatchery costs, the actual cost of caught fish in moving waters is more per pound than the supermarket.
    3. CDFW has been faking planting numbers for decades. When CDFW still published planting numbers, every plant ended in three zeroes. For many years I owned a lakefront home on Silver Lake in the Eastern Sierra when CDFW claimed it was stocking 13,000 fish. The creel counts were never consistent with the amount of claimed planting. We discovered the reason is that the planting numbers were imaginary. The “fish counting” process at the hatcheries is to fill the tanker with water, weigh it, add the fish and weigh again. The planting number was derived from the additional weight divided by the average weight of the fish stock being planted. Only problem is that NONE of the truck scales were functioning so CDFW “guesstimated.” We were able to show this because the amount of hatchery food purchased was far less than would have been required to sustain the number of fish at the hatchery.
    4. Hatcheries serve two purposes. CDFW uses them for promotional purposes and as an inducement to sell licenses. As far as the “biology” of hatcheries, hatcheries are operated primarily by electricians, plumbers and truck drivers. Back during my lawsuit, any biologists in Bishop who joined us in questioning the manner in which hatcheries were operated found themselves feeding catfish in the desert.

    Hatcheries should be a valuable source of subcatchables for put and grow waters and to experiment with finding strains better adapted to the warmer water temperatures of the future.

    Unfortunately the money that could have been invested in habitat enhancement in year round warm water fisheries, investments that return value year after year, has been poured down the rabbit hole of hatcheries.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Hooker View Post
    Unfortunately the money that could have been invested in habitat enhancement in year round warm water fisheries, investments that return value year after year, has been poured down the rabbit hole of hatcheries.
    I remember in the 90s when the bass fisherman LOVED the hatchery truck. They would chase it for other reasons, getting some pretty nice largies and stripers to go on the big baits. With the inconsistent and non existent stocks, that game is out the window. Look at Casitas for example.

    I definitely see the need for hatcheries, though. I know there have been strains of native fish that were on the brink if not for the assist lent by hatcheries, such as the historical Mt. Whitney hatchery. I think that is the reason why they were first created, to assist with the stocks of native fish. But it has gone away from that, but it seems the stocking of hatchery fish does bring anglers in, as is apparent in a lot of the posts on this message board, and is a great way to get younger anglers into the sport.

    But I agree. Spending the resources to feed the cormorants is probably not a good investment of public funding. But, what would be a viable solution? Stocking different fish that are easier to raise and do not have the environmental necessities as the trout? Spending the money to enhance our current fishery? I think the problem is that officials treat our lakes as big water coolers, instead of a recreational possibility, so fisherman are usually last on the list when it comes to appeasing people. Look at Lake Mathews.

    After heading down the rabbit hole of fly fishing, I've learned to appreciate the pristine nature of wild fish, especially native fish, and continue to pursue them season after season.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by FISHISH View Post
    You saw them stock dead fish!!!???
    Dead fish, oxygen depleted fish at Irvine Lake! The hatchery guy felt so bad about it, some lakes this coming week are getting an "double stocking!"

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by etucker1959 View Post
    Dead fish, oxygen depleted fish at Irvine Lake!
    So wait, was it Ralph B that got the dead fish?

    Or Irvine?

    Cmon, eTucker, ur confusing us.

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