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Thread: Better to to Catch and Release stripers or keep?

  1. #11

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    LOL!! You guys are a hoot!! Thanks for all the laughs.

    My query about Striper is not about eating, but about whether they are overpopulated and harvesting will actually increase the size of the stripers....:) I will just give the fish away to others really.

    Finally, there's a warning about swimming currently as there is some type of algea contamination. Dogs die from that type of algea.....not sure how serious it is currently.

  2. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Natural Lefty View Post
    Actually, Rainbow Trout are native to this region, including where Silverwood Lake is now, I think. The other species all come from east of the continental divide.

    And no, fish don't just show up on their own in new watersheds unless something drastic happens, like streams changing course. Rainbow Trout are native to various SoCal watersheds because they are able to go to sea and migrate up different streams, plus when the oceans were lower, streams that now do not meet used to confluence so that fish could swim from one to the other.
    We'll probably have to agree to disagree on this --- some creeks held historical southern steelhead, and still do, by DNA testing (evidence supported, published literature). However, many did not, hence the environmental successfully lobbying to eradicate rainbow trout as "invasive" from numerous southern California creeks. I don't believe there is evidence showing the creeks draining into Silverwood supported such a native population, although not impossible.


    To be clear -- I am not on the side of removing fish just because they aren't native. If that was the case, all of our brook trout and brown trout would be eliminated in the Sierras as well (some folks want this, sadly).
    I'm pointing out that advocating for a removal of a species simply because it is "invasive" and "not native" is far too wide a brush to use. Find better reasons.

    After all, most of us aren't "native" to the area either.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by etucker1959 View Post
    The funny part is, my friends really like fishing Lake Silverwood! We went 6 times in the last 3 months for other species and did real well. Thanks for the catfish tip! A couple of quick questions if you don't mind. When you say the swim beach area, do you mean in Cleghorn by the Life guard towers. Or up closer where that stupid trout fishing was in Cleghorn in June?
    Cleghorn beach near bouy line/tower, you can hit the river channel from there. Not many there for the heat of summer due to the algae warnings, we tube regularly there and Miller, no waders, yea algae is gonna kill us, lol.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ultralight View Post
    LOL!! You guys are a hoot!! Thanks for all the laughs.

    My query about Striper is not about eating, but about whether they are overpopulated and harvesting will actually increase the size of the stripers....:) I will just give the fish away to others really.

    Finally, there's a warning about swimming currently as there is some type of algea contamination. Dogs die from that type of algea.....not sure how serious it is currently.
    Overpopulated take as many as you can. All I can say is I’ve fished the lake for too many years to count, wet wading, kayaking and tubing all summer long. I have lots of physical issues but they’re age related, so far I’ve survived the dreaded algae but then again I don’t drink the water which is what is bad for the doggies. I’d say if you have some cuts or abrasions it would be wise to stay away from algae prone areas but those areas are usually in the shallower parts of the lake which explains Cleghorn being a higher count than other areas.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by carpanglerdude View Post
    We'll probably have to agree to disagree on this --- some creeks held historical southern steelhead, and still do, by DNA testing (evidence supported, published literature). However, many did not, hence the environmental successfully lobbying to eradicate rainbow trout as "invasive" from numerous southern California creeks. I don't believe there is evidence showing the creeks draining into Silverwood supported such a native population, although not impossible.


    To be clear -- I am not on the side of removing fish just because they aren't native. If that was the case, all of our brook trout and brown trout would be eliminated in the Sierras as well (some folks want this, sadly).
    I'm pointing out that advocating for a removal of a species simply because it is "invasive" and "not native" is far too wide a brush to use. Find better reasons.

    After all, most of us aren't "native" to the area either.
    Miller drainage holds trout up higher, Gregory drains into a feeder creek so some trout can get in that way. I’ve caught fish in both pools by the Mohave/Cleghorn and Miller that were wild in high water years. Yes up above Cleghorn are wild trout also. As far as native goes that’s a subject I don’t have the knowledge on.
    Last edited by seal; 08-29-2019 at 10:45 AM.

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by seal View Post
    Miller drainage holds trout up higher, Gregory drains into a feeder creek so some trout can get in that way. I’ve caught fish in both pools by the Mohave/Cleghorn and Miller that were wild in high water years. Yes up above Cleghorn are wild trout also. As far as native goes that’s a subject I don’t have the knowledge on.
    Would like to explore those creeks someday, although I think they got pretty hammered by the drought.
    The contention that groups like Center for Biological Diversity and other anti-nonnativetrout folks have is that many local creeks only have populations of trout that are descendants of prior stocked populations, now wild. Not populations that show genetic lineage to the southern steelhead species. As such, they claim they are thus invasive and should be wiped out. They were able to convince the Forest Service to do so in several nearby streams, and also stopped much of the local stream stocking due to that (related to the old spotted frog debacle).

  7. #17

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    Carpanglerdude, of course I am not in favor of wiping out non native fish populations, although I do think supporting and even extending native fish populations is a good idea. As I am sure you know, several kinds of trout are native to California, some of them exclusively so, including Golden Trout (2 varieties) and Paiute Cutthroat, nd several strains of Rainbow Trout such as Kern River Rainbow, Eagle Lake Rainbow and McCloud River Redband. Also, the ancestral stock for most hatchery raised Rainbow Trout apparently is of California origin, primarily from the Sacramento River watershed.

    I found a map of the native Coastal California Rainbow Trout range, and it is quite extensive even in Southern California, so as I said, they are native to this region, in many of the streams, whether in Steelhead form or stream resident form. However, they are not native to the Mojave River apparently. I had the impression that they were, but was never sure, due to the way that I have caught them in the Mojave River itself and some of its tributaries. Apparently, they were introduced long ago, however.


    Here is the map. https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Fishing/...oric-drainages
    Last edited by Natural Lefty; 08-29-2019 at 03:29 PM.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by seal View Post
    Cleghorn beach near bouy line/tower, you can hit the river channel from there. Not many there for the heat of summer due to the algae warnings, we tube regularly there and Miller, no waders, yea algae is gonna kill us, lol.
    Thanks! I'll give it a try when it rains!

  9. #19

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    Tapatio also kills that nasty algae .
    Put plenty on your tacos.

  10. #20

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    As far as stripers - keep all you want (within legal guidelines!) - given how prolific and adaptable they are, it probably will not adversely affect their populations. And with regards to your comment about catch and release on trout - I'm pretty sure that is not legal, (I'm speaking about stockers here, which the vast majority of trout in Silverwood or most waters would be). Their survivability is pretty low.

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