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Thread: Racist, Con Man, Cheat

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Harper View Post
    Stoolheap
    ...ftfy...

    Quote Originally Posted by bmachale View Post
    Trash. Cant believe anything he says. Good or bad. You certainly cannot take him seriously on any subject.
    The same could be said about Donald, and look where the idiots ended up putting him.

  2. #12

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    I would believe Cohen over Trump any day. Cohen testified under oath, under penalty of perjury, about Trump. I would like to see Trump testify under oath, but I have a feeling that he would do anything to avoid that.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Natural Lefty View Post
    I would believe Cohen over Trump any day. Cohen testified under oath, under penalty of perjury, about Trump. I would like to see Trump testify under oath, but I have a feeling that he would do anything to avoid that.
    Lefty, did you see who also might have to testify to Congress about some conversations he had with the President. Good ole Sean Hannity! That is another person who doesn't know how to tell the truth. Wouldn't it be poetic justice, if they threw him in jail for lying to Congress?
    Last edited by etucker1959; 03-06-2019 at 08:43 PM.

  4. #14

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    Yes, I saw that. I don't know what they want to ask Hannity, but he talks to the Donald a lot. I think Hannity will also try to avoid testifying, because that would put him between a rock and a hard place.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Panshot View Post
    An Interlude of Moral Clarity
    Michael Cohen’s testimony was a reminder that this presidency isn’t normal.

    “A Racist … A Con Man … A Cheat.” Those were the words etched in the chyron as Michael Cohen testified. Yet that litany somehow fails to do justice to Cohen’s moral portrait of Donald Trump.

    At the beginning of this presidency, the great fear was “normalization.” The shock of Donald Trump’s election, this theory held, would eventually dissipate. Once he sat behind the big desk, surrounded by oil paintings and heavy curtains, he would be bathed in the incantatory power of his office. The nation would absorb the shock of his misogyny, racism, venality, and dangerous vainglory, and then move on. Perhaps the fact that normalization has slipped from discourse is evidence that there was something to this fear.

    Cohen, unabashedly self-servingly, describes his own time with Trump as a microcosm of this same experience. In his telling, Trump’s morality drags down everyone surrounding him, so that a “good person” like Cohen ends up committing terrible misdeeds. “Lying for Mr. Trump was normalized, and no one around him questioned it.”

    Normalization is hard to resist. Knowing that the man who controls the nuclear arsenal and directs the surveillance state is unguided by an ethical framework and has a boundless capacity for petty cruelty can make it hard to shut one’s eyes at night. So despite the wildness of Trump’s tweets and the harshness of his policies, the mind inevitably suppresses what it knows about his character so that it isn’t overwhelmed by anxiety.

    Nothing in today’s testimony brings the nation directly closer to the impeachment of the president. But Cohen’s testimony provided one of those interludes of clarity that violently dislodges the tendency toward normalization. When a congresswoman asked Cohen, “What do you think [the president] can do to you?,” he replied, “A lot,” and added, “I have fear.” Once again, it’s hard not to feel a little like Cohen.

    What I found most profitable in his testimony were the little details about Trump he captures—the casual ease with which the president disparaged the intelligence of his own son or those who served in Vietnam. Trump, Cohen claims, gave the order to pay firms to rig internet straw polls on the Drudge Report and CNBC on the eve of the presidential contest. This is not the behavior of someone with a deep faith in democracy.

    Or take Cohen’s description of Trump’s racist remarks. While there’s little surprise in the revelation, it’s bracing to hear Trump’s language. Driving through a neighborhood in Chicago, he allegedly told Cohen “that black people would never vote for him because they were too stupid.” In Trump’s moral universe, it’s fair to judge an entire race for not showing him sufficient political love. These anecdotes capture the president’s dangerously precarious ego and a vanity that knows no bounds.

    Vanity seems to be at the core of the Russia scandal, at least as far as we can now describe it with any confidence. When the founders of the republic wrote about corruption, they worried that a leader would confuse his own interests with the nation’s. That’s precisely how Cohen describes Trump’s view of Moscow.

    According to Cohen, Trump had no expectation of victory in the presidential race. Instead, he treated his campaign as a giant infomercial aimed at the Russians, whose cooperation he needed for Trump Tower Moscow to proceed. He spent months fawning over Vladimir Putin, publicly apologizing for the abuses of his regime and begging for improved relations, as he tried to firm up the deal. In other words, the current trajectory of American foreign policy began as an effort to make a fortune. These were real financial interests that the president lied about, blatantly and constantly. Whatever else we discover through Robert Mueller’s investigation, that’s a historic scandal in itself.

    In attempting to tear down Cohen, his Republican questioners set a litmus test that their primary client will never be able to survive. They said that the nation shouldn’t waste its time on a man with a demonstrable pattern of lying; they said that we should never pay any heed to someone so intent on profiting from publicity. As they fulminated, I revised the chyron in my head: A Racist … A Con Man … A Cheat … A President.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/ar...-cheat/583795/
    You left out best POTUS ever. Thanks quagga.

  6. #16
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    GM to Trump: 'To be clear,' the company and UAW will decide fate of Lordstown plant
    By Rob McLean, CNN Business
    Updated 10:47 PM ET, Sun March 17, 2019


    New York (CNN Business) - GM responded late Sunday to a series of angry tweets from President Donald Trump demanding that the automaker reopen or sell a plant it recently closed because of shifting customer demand.

    "To be clear, under the terms of the UAW-GM National Agreement, the ultimate future of the unallocated plants will be resolved between GM and the UAW," GM (GM) said in a statement, referring to the United Automobile Workers union.

    The automaker announced a major global restructuring in November, including the closure of four US plants and another in Canada. It said it would cut 8,000 salaried and contract jobs, representing a 15% reduction in its workforce.

    Trump tweeted Sunday evening that he spoke with GM CEO Mary Barra about the affected factory in Lordstown, Ohio. Trump said that he "asked her to sell it or do something quickly" but that Barra "blamed the UAW Union."

    Trump has repeatedly attacked GM and personally criticized Barra since the closures were first announced — perhaps in the hope that the giant carmaker would give him a political win by reconsidering its plans.

    Lordstown is the first of the four US plants GM is closing. It had 1,435 hourly workers last year at the time the company announced plans to close it. Production at the plant ended this month.

    GM said in its statement Sunday that its main focus was offering employees jobs in other plants "where we have growth opportunities."

    "We have now placed over 1,000 employees from our unallocated plants to other GM locations, and we have opportunities available for virtually all impacted employees," it added.

    Earlier Sunday, Trump accused GM of letting the United States down and criticized David Green, the local UAW president, labeling him a Democrat.

    Green didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

    Lordstown Mayor Arno Hill said he disagreed with Trump's criticism of the local union leader.

    Green "is in same boat as me," Hill said. "We have no local control, as it is between GM and UAW International. They both have a stake in this now. We will still push for a new product and remain optimistic. I am not going to beat up GM because they've been here for 53 years, they've been good neighbors."

    Brian Rothenberg, a spokesman for UAW International, said that the union's focus is on its members and that it "will leave no stone unturned in working to keep the plants open."

    Trump's GM tweets capped a day of presidential fuming on social media.

    https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/17/busin...ant/index.html

  7. #17
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    Comey: I ‘don’t care’ if Mueller finds wrongdoing by Trump
    By KATIE GALIOTO | 03/21/2019 04:21 PM EDT | Updated 03/21/2019 04:55 PM EDT

    Former FBI Director James Comey on Thursday said he doesn’t know whether special counsel Robert Mueller will find wrongdoing by President Donald Trump — and “I also don’t care.”

    Comey, whom Trump fired nearly two years ago, wrote in a New York Times op-ed that he only wanted “maximum transparency” surrounding the special counsel’s investigation, which is expected to conclude any day now.

    “I have no idea whether the special counsel will conclude that Mr. Trump knowingly conspired with the Russians in connection with the 2016 election or that he obstructed justice with the required corrupt intent,” Comey wrote. “I also don’t care. I care only that the work be done, well and completely.”

    Comey also wrote that his “one hope” was that Trump not be impeached before the end of his term, instead encouraging critics of the president to focus on electing another candidate in 2020.

    “I don’t mean that Congress shouldn’t move ahead with the process of impeachment governed by our Constitution, if Congress thinks the provable facts are there. I just hope it doesn’t,” he said. “Because if Mr. Trump were removed from office by Congress, a significant portion of this country would see this as a coup, and it would drive those people farther from the common center of American life, more deeply fracturing our country.”

    Trump fired Comey — who served as FBI director from 2013 to May 2017 — after the pair clashed over the agency’s Russia probe. It was Comey’s dismissal that prompted Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to appoint Mueller to oversee the probe of whether Russia colluded with Trump’s 2016 campaign.

    Comey has been openly critical of Trump since leaving the Justice Department, rebuking both the president’s actions and character on multiple occasions. In the op-ed, he wrote that while he considers Trump “morally unfit,” he is not rooting for a specific outcome when Mueller’s findings are complete.

    “Wondering is fine,” he wrote. “But hoping for a particular answer is not. The rule of law depends upon fair administration of justice, which is rooted in complete and unbiased investigation.”

    Instead, Comey wrote he wants “a demonstration to the world” that the Justice Department is effective and fair.

    “That system may reach conclusions they like or it may not, but the apolitical administration of justice is the beating heart of this country,” he wrote. “I hope we all get to see that.”

    https://www.politico.com/story/2019/...p-oped-1231425

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Panshot View Post
    An Interlude of Moral Clarity
    Michael Cohen’s testimony was a reminder that this presidency isn’t normal.

    “A Racist … A Con Man … A Cheat.” Those were the words etched in the chyron as Michael Cohen testified. Yet that litany somehow fails to do justice to Cohen’s moral portrait of Donald Trump.

    At the beginning of this presidency, the great fear was “normalization.” The shock of Donald Trump’s election, this theory held, would eventually dissipate. Once he sat behind the big desk, surrounded by oil paintings and heavy curtains, he would be bathed in the incantatory power of his office. The nation would absorb the shock of his misogyny, racism, venality, and dangerous vainglory, and then move on. Perhaps the fact that normalization has slipped from discourse is evidence that there was something to this fear.

    Cohen, unabashedly self-servingly, describes his own time with Trump as a microcosm of this same experience. In his telling, Trump’s morality drags down everyone surrounding him, so that a “good person” like Cohen ends up committing terrible misdeeds. “Lying for Mr. Trump was normalized, and no one around him questioned it.”

    Normalization is hard to resist. Knowing that the man who controls the nuclear arsenal and directs the surveillance state is unguided by an ethical framework and has a boundless capacity for petty cruelty can make it hard to shut one’s eyes at night. So despite the wildness of Trump’s tweets and the harshness of his policies, the mind inevitably suppresses what it knows about his character so that it isn’t overwhelmed by anxiety.

    Nothing in today’s testimony brings the nation directly closer to the impeachment of the president. But Cohen’s testimony provided one of those interludes of clarity that violently dislodges the tendency toward normalization. When a congresswoman asked Cohen, “What do you think [the president] can do to you?,” he replied, “A lot,” and added, “I have fear.” Once again, it’s hard not to feel a little like Cohen.

    What I found most profitable in his testimony were the little details about Trump he captures—the casual ease with which the president disparaged the intelligence of his own son or those who served in Vietnam. Trump, Cohen claims, gave the order to pay firms to rig internet straw polls on the Drudge Report and CNBC on the eve of the presidential contest. This is not the behavior of someone with a deep faith in democracy.

    Or take Cohen’s description of Trump’s racist remarks. While there’s little surprise in the revelation, it’s bracing to hear Trump’s language. Driving through a neighborhood in Chicago, he allegedly told Cohen “that black people would never vote for him because they were too stupid.” In Trump’s moral universe, it’s fair to judge an entire race for not showing him sufficient political love. These anecdotes capture the president’s dangerously precarious ego and a vanity that knows no bounds.

    Vanity seems to be at the core of the Russia scandal, at least as far as we can now describe it with any confidence. When the founders of the republic wrote about corruption, they worried that a leader would confuse his own interests with the nation’s. That’s precisely how Cohen describes Trump’s view of Moscow.

    According to Cohen, Trump had no expectation of victory in the presidential race. Instead, he treated his campaign as a giant infomercial aimed at the Russians, whose cooperation he needed for Trump Tower Moscow to proceed. He spent months fawning over Vladimir Putin, publicly apologizing for the abuses of his regime and begging for improved relations, as he tried to firm up the deal. In other words, the current trajectory of American foreign policy began as an effort to make a fortune. These were real financial interests that the president lied about, blatantly and constantly. Whatever else we discover through Robert Mueller’s investigation, that’s a historic scandal in itself.

    In attempting to tear down Cohen, his Republican questioners set a litmus test that their primary client will never be able to survive. They said that the nation shouldn’t waste its time on a man with a demonstrable pattern of lying; they said that we should never pay any heed to someone so intent on profiting from publicity. As they fulminated, I revised the chyron in my head: A Racist … A Con Man … A Cheat … A President.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/ar...-cheat/583795/
    Add to your list. No collusion

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