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Thread: Take the California Heritage Trout Challenge

  1. #1
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    Feb 2008
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    Default Take the California Heritage Trout Challenge




    California's natural heritage includes one of the most diverse assemblages of native trout found in the United States. Over the millennia, 12 different types of trout evolved to inhabit the diverse habitats found in California. These include temperate rain forests, high deserts, large inland rivers, isolated lake basins and mountain streams.


    The California Heritage Trout Challenge was designed to promote the ecological and aesthetic values of native trout and their habitats, encourage anglers to learn more about the state’s natural heritage and build public support for native trout restoration efforts.

    To qualify for the challenge, six different native trout must be caught within their historic ranges. The requirements to document your catch include where, when and how each fish was caught, along with a photograph of the trout. Those who complete the challenge, receive a colorful, personalized certificate featuring the art of renowned fish illustrator Joseph Tomelleri.

    For the native trout fanatic or for those who want to extend their pursuit of the challenge, CDFW created the elite Master Angler recognition for those who capture and document all 11 subspecies currently recognized in California.

    CDFW recently released the Angler's Guide to the Heritage Trout Challenge, a new online tool for those interested in fishing for California's heritage trout. The guide provides anglers with detailed information on how to complete the challenge, including information about where to catch native trout, identification tips and a history of habitat restoration efforts.

    CDFW encourages anglers, families and friends to “take the challenge” and explore new waters and appreciate the diverse fishing opportunities California has to offer.

  2. #2

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    Damn.

    So that holdover brown I caught on a nightcrawler at PVR doesn't qualify?

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Quagga View Post
    Damn.

    So that holdover brown I caught on a nightcrawler at PVR doesn't qualify?
    O get over it

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Quagga View Post
    Damn.

    So that holdover brown I caught on a nightcrawler at PVR doesn't qualify?
    LOL! Thanks for the chuckle.

    The challenge sounds fascinating!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Long Beach, CA
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    I've got some friends who sent me an email about 15 minutes after this came out.. "ROAD TRIP!!" lol!

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    that is way coola few years back I had a correspondence with a biologist/professor at the U of W about the native range of cut throat. My brother had asserted that they were native to both the East and West slope of the Rockies and I told him that was impossible - it had to be one or the other.

    Turns out I was wrong. Cut throat species is older than present continental geology and drainage system(s). As the Rockies rose/fell/changed the population was split into the present Pacific drainage lineage and those of the Gulf of Mexico drainage. There are eve some native populations in bodies of water that no longer flow to the sea.

    fascinating, fascinating stuff.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by City Dad View Post
    that is way coola few years back I had a correspondence with a biologist/professor at the U of W about the native range of cut throat. My brother had asserted that they were native to both the East and West slope of the Rockies and I told him that was impossible - it had to be one or the other.

    Turns out I was wrong. Cut throat species is older than present continental geology and drainage system(s). As the Rockies rose/fell/changed the population was split into the present Pacific drainage lineage and those of the Gulf of Mexico drainage. There are eve some native populations in bodies of water that no longer flow to the sea.

    fascinating, fascinating stuff.
    Pick up the book "Trout and Salmon of North America" by the honorable doctor trout, Dr. Robert Behnke. The illustrations by Joseph Tomelleri are fantastic.



    For some reason, it's out of print and worth more than the original Magna Carta apparently, but I found mine at a Goodwill for 15 bucks.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/0743222202...5363903&sr=8-2

    It goes into the fascinating history about pretty much every species of trout and salmon of North America. Of particular interest is the Kern trio of 'native trout,' and how the Kern River Rainbow doesn't exist in it's pure form anymore, thanks to hybridization that occurred throughout the early 1900s.

    I'm waiting to see what happens with restoration of the Pauite up in Silver Creek. Hopefully they finish the rotenone treatment and move the original inhabitants back using broodstock from 'secret' creeks where they were stocked into while the poisoning was done.

  8. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DarkShadow View Post
    Pick up the book "Trout and Salmon of North America" by the honorable doctor trout, Dr. Robert Behnke. The illustrations by Joseph Tomelleri are fantastic.



    For some reason, it's out of print and worth more than the original Magna Carta apparently, but I found mine at a Goodwill for 15 bucks.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/0743222202...5363903&sr=8-2

    It goes into the fascinating history about pretty much every species of trout and salmon of North America. Of particular interest is the Kern trio of 'native trout,' and how the Kern River Rainbow doesn't exist in it's pure form anymore, thanks to hybridization that occurred throughout the early 1900s.

    I'm waiting to see what happens with restoration of the Pauite up in Silver Creek. Hopefully they finish the rotenone treatment and move the original inhabitants back using broodstock from 'secret' creeks where they were stocked into while the poisoning was done.


    Good recs! Thanks!

    And thanks for sharing this Challenge. That's a lot of driving!

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