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Thread: the decline of DVL ....... BLAME IT OF THE STRIPERS..please no catch and release guys

  1. #1

    Default the decline of DVL ....... BLAME IT OF THE STRIPERS..please no catch and release guys

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ID:	38286the decline of diamond valley lake is due to the invasive striper and the econimic effects on the metropolital water authority ......period
    When a three-pound striped bass was caught in Diamond Valley Lake in 2001, two years before the massive reservoir by Hemet opened to the public, the uninvited saltwater fish that thrives in fresh water foreshadowed big things to come -- BIG MISTAKE
    The reservoir's fishery was carefully developed as a habitat for largemouth bass, trout, bluegill and catfish. The invasive and voracious striped bass that dines on all of them somehow found its way into the lake. Unlike carp, a boney junk fish, stripers are liked. They draw anglers to the lake today because they are big, fight hard and are considered tasty.SO WHAT HAPPENED
    Mike Giusti, a senior environment scientist with the state Department of Fish and Game, said small stripers likely arrived in water pumped into the lake and then grew and multiplied. They are such aggressive feeders that they gobble trout as they are planted in the reservoir, prompting Fish and Game to make plants in several spots around the lake so the fish aren't devoured.WHICH IS REDICULES
    The lake's striper record is 33 pounds, the size of a hefty tuna caught in the ocean. It is common for anglers to land limits of 10 fish. Stripers often weigh 15 pounds or more.
    Largemouth bass anglers routinely release their catch to grow larger. The sportsmanlike practice is not encouraged with stripers.DONT RELEASE STRIPERS YOU STUPID FISHERMAN!!!
    Giusti, who developed the Diamond Valley Lake fishery starting with breeding ponds on the reservoir's floor before water was pumped in, wants anglers to keep stripers so their ever-growing population and predatory feeding of other fish is held in check. So far, he said, they haven't reached proportions requiring action to reduce their numbers, like introducing sterile fish to thwart their breeding.WELL.............THIS ARTICULE IS 5 YEARS OLD....NOW ITS TOO LATE
    Stripers are a boon to guides who entertains customers with tales about the thrill of catching big, rod-bending stripers with and happily shows them pictures of big fish they caught.
    Stripers have been good to guides.
    STRIPERS HAVE BEEN BAD TO THIS LAKE
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    Last edited by LORDOFTHEDEEP; 12-12-2012 at 08:27 AM.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by LORDOFTHEDEEP View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	38286the decline of diamond valley lake is due to the invasive striper and the econimic effects on the metropolital water authority ......period
    When a three-pound striped bass was caught in Diamond Valley Lake in 2001, two years before the massive reservoir by Hemet opened to the public, the uninvited saltwater fish that thrives in fresh water foreshadowed big things to come -- BIG MISTAKE
    The reservoir's fishery was carefully developed as a habitat for largemouth bass, trout, bluegill and catfish. The invasive and voracious striped bass that dines on all of them somehow found its way into the lake. Unlike carp, a boney junk fish, stripers are liked. They draw anglers to the lake today because they are big, fight hard and are considered tasty.SO WHAT HAPPENED
    Mike Giusti, a senior environment scientist with the state Department of Fish and Game, said small stripers likely arrived in water pumped into the lake and then grew and multiplied. They are such aggressive feeders that they gobble trout as they are planted in the reservoir, prompting Fish and Game to make plants in several spots around the lake so the fish aren't devoured.WHICH IS REDICULES
    The lake's striper record is 33 pounds, the size of a hefty tuna caught in the ocean. It is common for anglers to land limits of 10 fish. Stripers often weigh 15 pounds or more.
    Largemouth bass anglers routinely release their catch to grow larger. The sportsmanlike practice is not encouraged with stripers.DONT RELEASE STRIPERS YOU STUPID FISHERMAN!!!
    Giusti, who developed the Diamond Valley Lake fishery starting with breeding ponds on the reservoir's floor before water was pumped in, wants anglers to keep stripers so their ever-growing population and predatory feeding of other fish is held in check. So far, he said, they haven't reached proportions requiring action to reduce their numbers, like introducing sterile fish to thwart their breeding.WELL.............THIS ARTICULE IS 5 YEARS OLD....NOW ITS TOO LATE
    Stripers are a boon to guides who entertains customers with tales about the thrill of catching big, rod-bending stripers with and happily shows them pictures of big fish they caught.
    Stripers have been good to guides.
    STRIPERS HAVE BEEN BAD TO THIS LAKE
    I dunno man.

    If the stripers were that bad for a fishery, you'd think the DFG would do something about it.

    Right?

    Tell 'em, Kwin.

  3. #3

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    It's typical in my mind. Down years at lakes are the norm not an exception. Couple years ago nobody was concerned, both big LMB's and Stripers were coming out easily, difference is possibly the forage population is in a down year creating a different type of fishery. DVL is still too new for anybody other than the experts (Kwin) to determine if there is a permanent problem. Amateur biologists (aka know it all fisherman) do not have the answers at this point.

  4. #4

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    they need to plant some water plants around the lake that will survive ...........like reeds so they can develop some type of ecology around the shoreline so amphibians can start living and breeding ,like frogs snakes other food source and put in a restraunt in the parking lot that cooks upcheeseburgers and stripers 24/7 you clean you fish in a cleaning station and they cook you up a shore lunch
    they need to put in some type of pier that extends out into the lake for pier fishing and with enough lighting they could open up for night fishing
    with the money that generates they could build a campground down the hill from the lake and that would be the final step
    then they could offord to stock yhe lake with blugill catfish bass and crapis well as trout shoot why not talapia ???????????????
    AND if they could blast some christian metal from some speakers I would appreciate it
    Quote Originally Posted by DarkShadow View Post
    I dunno man.

    If the stripers were that bad for a fishery, you'd think the DFG would do something about it.

    Right?

    Tell 'em, Kwin.
    Last edited by LORDOFTHEDEEP; 12-12-2012 at 10:13 AM.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DarkShadow View Post
    I dunno man.

    If the stripers were that bad for a fishery, you'd think the DFG would do something about it.

    Right?

    Tell 'em, Kwin.
    and what am I to do? The Department have encouraged harvest. The limit is 10 per day with no size restriction. As long as there are stripers in your water source and/or they have the ability to breed successfully (which they do in DVL) they will always be there. Raising the limit is an empty regulation change because most anglers cannot or are not harvesting even 10 in a day. If my angler survey data indicates that is happening, I will look into it. Until then, it remains at 10 per day per person w/no size limit.

    Now as a management objective (since they are never going away) I would like to manage for larger average size because I believe that is what the angling public prefers and I have high management standards. I've never heard anyone complain about catching a 20+ lb striped bass. Therefore, in order to acheive that management goal, the objective is to reduce their overall numbers to decrease density dependancy and average size should improve, hence promotion of harvest. Look at Lake Perris for example, striped bass do not spawn successfully there and are only introduced if/when water is moved down from Silverwood....low density equals larger average size. Reducing the density of striped bass should also benefit other species by reducing intraspecific competition for food and space.

    The truth is striped bass angling at DVL has increased from 850 hours sampled in 2009 to 11,422 hours sampled in 2011. Harvest rates have increased from 57 reported kept in 2009 (a 52% harvest rate) to 3,459 reported kept in 2011 (a 92% harvest rate). The average size has decreased due to increased densities of the species over that time period despite higher harvest rates. The data collected indicates harvest rates have increased, which is good, though I believe striped bass fecundity out paces angler harvest. The only question is can the amount harvested by anglers be enough to allow appropriate densities to see a larger average size? Time will tell. In the meantime I encourage harvest of striped bass within DVL and every other inland water where they are present to acheive larger average size striped bass.

  6. #6

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    man I seen guys taking largemouths out of there and walk into the office to get their picture taken and there just nonsportsman . i think has an effect over time look at skinner
    Quote Originally Posted by seal View Post
    It's typical in my mind. Down years at lakes are the norm not an exception. Couple years ago nobody was concerned, both big LMB's and Stripers were coming out easily, difference is possibly the forage population is in a down year creating a different type of fishery. DVL is still too new for anybody other than the experts (Kwin) to determine if there is a permanent problem. Amateur biologists (aka know it all fisherman) do not have the answers at this point.

  7. #7

    Default

    they need a restraunt for cooking these things up
    and elsinore should have a Jamacian style carp shack restraunt for jerk carp
    Quote Originally Posted by kwin View Post
    and what am I to do? The Department have encouraged harvest. The limit is 10 per day with no size restriction. As long as there are stripers in your water source and/or they have the ability to breed successfully (which they do in DVL) they will always be there. Raising the limit is an empty regulation change because most anglers cannot or are not harvesting even 10 in a day. If my angler survey data indicates that is happening, I will look into it. Until then, it remains at 10 per day per person w/no size limit.

    Now as a management objective (since they are never going away) I would like to manage for larger average size because I believe that is what the angling public prefers and I have high management standards. I've never heard anyone complain about catching a 20+ lb striped bass. Therefore, in order to acheive that management goal, the objective is to reduce their overall numbers to decrease density dependancy and average size should improve, hence promotion of harvest. Look at Lake Perris for example, striped bass do not spawn successfully there and are only introduced if/when water is moved down from Silverwood....low density equals larger average size. Reducing the density of striped bass should also benefit other species by reducing intraspecific competition for food and space.

    The truth is striped bass angling at DVL has increased from 850 hours sampled in 2009 to 11,422 hours sampled in 2011. Harvest rates have increased from 57 reported kept in 2009 (a 52% harvest rate) to 3,459 reported kept in 2011 (a 92% harvest rate). The average size has decreased due to increased densities of the species over that time period despite higher harvest rates. The data collected indicates harvest rates have increased, which is good, though I believe striped bass fecundity out paces angler harvest. The only question is can the amount harvested by anglers be enough to allow appropriate densities to see a larger average size? Time will tell. In the meantime I encourage harvest of striped bass within DVL and every other inland water where they are present to acheive larger average size striped bass.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LORDOFTHEDEEP View Post
    man I seen guys taking largemouths out of there and walk into the office to get their picture taken and there just nonsportsman . i think has an effect over time look at skinner
    Wait is it the stripers or the fisherman that are causing the population issues at DVL? We all have our opinions that's what makes it fun to try and second guess the fish and figure out what's going on, nothing wrong with that. But so often you read posts like this that because a lake has a down year or 2 the demise of the fishery has already occurred or in the process of occurring. It always gives me a good chuckle cause I really don't think we know much of anything. I've sent notes to the powers that be on my concerns at Silverwood, from a laymen's point of view, and for the most part my concerns are pretty much invalid, I'm there most days yet I do not know much at all about the management of the lake.

    Thanks to Kwin for straightening us know it all's out occasionally!

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    As always, when I see a person use proper english like the word "fecundity" and its used in proper text reguarding the subject in the sentence, I know this person is the real deal.
    Kwin thanks for the info and stats as most in this forum usually start these ravings, rants and the use of two many periods between words to get something going when this forum should as always be for exchanging fishing reports. Like my mom use to say, opinions are like _ss holes and everybody's has got one so glad Lord you got another one off your shoulders and how about you go over to the other SoCal freshwater discussion and rant on Jess Ranch issue. Seems like you modus operandi!

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kwin View Post
    As long as there are stripers in your water source and/or they have the ability to breed successfully (which they do in DVL) they will always be there.
    Kwin, quick question.

    Castaic Lake was built in 1973. Stripers didn't, um, 'affect' that fishery until the late 90s.

    DVL was completed in 2003.

    Stripers ruined that fishery 2.5 times faster than Castaic.

    If both sources for both reservoirs contained stripers, and obviously Castaic's biology allows for reproduction just like DVL, what do you think was the reason for the difference in time span (25 years, versus 10) before the stripers took over at either reservoir? Was DVL's biodiversity that great that it allowed a species to gain traction 2.5 times faster than in other similar bodies of water?

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