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Thread: Rainbow trout fishing with a lure?

  1. #1
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    Default Rainbow trout fishing with a lure?

    So a few weeks ago i was at a lake and trout where jumping everywhere. I was bait and wait fishing and nothing. I had a kastmaster lure I never tried. Put it on and first cast fish on! The issue I am having is I lose more fish then I land. Never fishing for trout with a lure I have noticed they have a soft mouth and i feel bad for some of the damage I have done to them. Is there a trick? Am I setting the hook to hard? Trying to get them in to fast? Wrong lure? I have been lucky the past few times out and when I hook in I give the pole to either my 5 or 6 yr to real in and they get mad when they spit the hook. Any help would be great

  2. #2
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    Depending in the water that you're at. Each water body has different food sources, so, the fishes hunt for different things each time. Which water body are you at?

    But, there is a commonality that I've noticed. Trouts hunt surface trapped bugs, such as spiders, crickets, dragonflies, and long legged critters. I normally get the Betsy fly lures that has foam bugs already tied to bait hooks size #8, #10, and #12. Rig a nice 2 feet leader on a sliding bobber rig, attach a clear bobber that can be filled with a bit of water for additional weight, and toss the floating lure into the water. Real about 8 inches every 50 seconds. Those trouts won't know what hit them. This will have the same effect with the panfishes.

  3. #3

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    Are you using a light-tipped rod? If not that may be the case. As far as setting the hook is concerned, that could be attributing as well. You really should not set the hook when using lures or exposed hooks. Swinging on them like you're fishing a worm or bait will probablly do more harm then good.
    Kastmasters and Yo Zuri inner minnows are great lures for trout, particularly when its sunny!
    HTH

  4. #4
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    Another good lure for trout are rooster tails. I've had trout chase after them and one even jumped out of the water towards me while I was reeling it in. And on a good note, when you lose them it's not as expensive as losing a kastmaster.

  5. #5

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    Your drag could be to loose.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHOWTIME View Post
    Are you using a light-tipped rod? If not that may be the case. As far as setting the hook is concerned, that could be attributing as well. You really should not set the hook when using lures or exposed hooks. Swinging on them like you're fishing a worm or bait will probablly do more harm then good.
    Kastmasters and Yo Zuri inner minnows are great lures for trout, particularly when its sunny!
    HTH
    Ok The first time I was using a light tipped rod and landed more fish. The second time I wasn't an had about a 50/50 rate on what I brought in. I do not want to damage what I don't wanna keep and some when I brought in I have destroyed their jaw. So I keep them. Maybe thinking to much into this if i am let me know.

    P.S I have gotten so lucky on 3 tries and 3 different lake and I have to drive some distance to get there. I do not want to limit out in a hour so C&R is important so I can kill the time

  7. #7
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    It's the rod and the way you are using it.
    You gotta change something up.
    Usually if you are "pulling hooks" the rod is too stiff or you are muscling in the fish.
    If you are missing hooksets then the rod is not stiff enough or you didn't set hard enough.

    A softer rod will help keep the hook in longer. But you may have to slam the hookset harder to compensate.

    Kastmasters are heavy too and trout shake a lot. It's easy for them to shake it out.
    You will need the right rod AND you will somewhat have to get them in quickly.

    You really should not set the hook when using lures or exposed hooks.
    I actually find a firm lift when I get hit on Panther Martins and Crankbaits with the right rod is usually OK. They do have those small hooks that pull easy but you need a light rod and they'll stay right in. You will need to set the hook a bit though, specially if the trout are 14" or larger as they begin to get harder jaws.

    I lost a bunch of goldens one trip on panther martins because I couldn't get a good hookset. I had too light of a rod with me.
    With the right rod you will still need to drive the hook in some, but you will notice baits staying planted in lips longer.
    Don't forget to not reel against the drag and keep all your slack out. If you give a lure fish slack, that's the upper hand for them to shake the lure out. Specially with a trout or bass. From the time you get bit to the time you land the fish make sure the rod always has at least a slight bend in it.
    Last edited by tacklejunkie; 08-04-2011 at 05:45 PM.

  8. #8

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    Another way to not damage the fish so much would be to cut two of the treble hooks off and make the third barbless by crimping it down. Now that being said, I fly fish with single barbless hooks and have caught and released a whole lot of fish with nothing more then hole in their lip. I don't lose them because I keep slight tension on the line as I strip it in. I do it because I don't meat fish but enjoy the grab and take. I seldom have long distance releases with the barbless hooks. Normally, I don't even touch the fish. I net them and use my Ketchum release tool to take the hook out of the fishes mouth...ooh and ahh over the fish and send him on his way without touching him with my hands. When you catch one you'd like to keep, well you know what to do.

  9. #9
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    It's actually kinda hard IMO to find the right trout rod for crankbaits and artificials. (such as kastmanster and panther martins etc)

    I like the berkley 6' tactix spinning rod myself.. it's made for drop shot and finesse fishing but it's one of the best all around 4lb rods I have tried. Works really great for trout and bass fishing light line. The high modulous provides a lovely action to the light tip. $53.... Walmart.

    I just built a pretty nice marbled custom rod I intended to be for bass but it had a bit more moderate action than I would have liked and turned out to be a great panther martin and trout crankbait rod. If anyone is interested in purchasing it let me know. Works great.. got a 17" wild on it the other day for dinner using a rapala CD-5. Rod was bent ina U-shape for two minutes making sure it didn't release the tiny hooks on the crankbait.
    Last edited by tacklejunkie; 08-04-2011 at 06:00 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Viejo View Post
    Another way to not damage the fish so much would be to cut two of the treble hooks off and make the third barbless by crimping it down. Now that being said, I fly fish with single barbless hooks and have caught and released a whole lot of fish with nothing more then hole in their lip. I don't lose them because I keep slight tension on the line as I strip it in. I do it because I don't meat fish but enjoy the grab and take. I seldom have long distance releases with the barbless hooks. Normally, I don't even touch the fish. I net them and use my Ketchum release tool to take the hook out of the fishes mouth...ooh and ahh over the fish and send him on his way without touching him with my hands. When you catch one you'd like to keep, well you know what to do.
    Good advice.
    If you do insist on holding or photographing the fish that you don't plan to take, use WET HANDS BEFORE YOU HOLD THEM so you don't mess the fish scales and slime coat up. Use nets that are made for trout. All too often I see people grab the fish dry handed or even us a WHITE TOWEL of all things to hold the fish before releasing it. Bad news! That fish probably won't last long.

    I would highly recommend those nets to any serious trout angler or weekend trouter. Get the net wet before you net a fish with it too. I drag one around hanging from the back of my fly vest by a magnetic release and cord safety system. It's right there when I need it for good size fish I'm going to release but really want a picture and measurement.
    Last edited by tacklejunkie; 08-04-2011 at 06:28 PM.

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