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Thread: How long does gas stay good?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Whittier/Tustin
    Posts
    791

    Default How long does gas stay good?

    I've heard that gas goes bad after 2-3 weeks, is that right? And how about with the 2 stroke oil?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Chatsworth, CA
    Posts
    217

    Default

    Gas does not go bad after 2-3 weeks. That is BS. Slow octane loss may start within 2-3 months, but the gas will still be good enough to run after 6 months or even a year as long as it is stored under relatively moisture and contamination-free conditions. Per Chevron, gas should be good for up to a year:
    http://www.chevron.com/products/prod..._gasoline.aspx

    Oil will stay good basically forever as long as it is stored in airtight, moisture-free containers.

    Tight Lines,
    Kev

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Big Bear & Claremont
    Posts
    205

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    Well we have gas go bad in fuel tanks to the point that it will no longer start the unit and this happens in 2-3 months, also in smaller displacement units the carbs will clog quickly, we have fuel pump freeze up from fuel hardening in moving components of the pump itself typically to the point that the pump has to be replaced, we have tried to use various different brands of stabilizers all with similar results my personal favorite additive for fuel storage is synthetic 2-cycle oil mixed @ 100to1 this leaves a nice oily residue instead of the hard gas residue the oily remains rinse away quickly once fresh gas tries to run thru, same thing on the fuel pumps it'll help keep them alive longer the only time this added oil could be a concern is around catalytic converters as they don't really like oil but were talking a very minimal amount of gas or oil here I would'nt believe too much of what the oil companies have to say or least take it with a huge grain of salt as they are continually covering there asses they are the ones that wrote the book on CYA.

    Fastfish

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rat Beach
    Posts
    6,238

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fastfish View Post
    Well we have gas go bad in fuel tanks to the point that it will no longer start the unit and this happens in 2-3 months, also in smaller displacement units the carbs will clog quickly, we have fuel pump freeze up from fuel hardening in moving components of the pump itself typically to the point that the pump has to be replaced, Fastfish
    Fuel bad in 2 - 3 months ???? My 150 hp V6 2 stroke Johnson fires right up on 6 month old gas.
    Bought and sold cars for years and found gas to thicken and smell like varnish after two or more years.

    Here some stuff I dug up. DR


    PETROL AND TWO STROKE MIX – STORAGE IN CONTAINERS
    Volatile fuels such as petrol and two stroke mixes will store for up to one year in a sealed container. After that period the fuel may still be fit for purpose but problems such as hard starting and spark plug fouling may occur due to lack of light components.

    Once the seal is broken then lighter components evaporate and the storage life is best assumed to be 6 months at ambient temperatures of 20 deg C and 3 months at ambient temperatures of 30 degrees C or more.

    EXAMPLE OF HOW PETROL CHANGES WHEN STORED IN FUEL TANK

    Property_____________Week 1___Week 2___Week 3___Week 4___Week 5
    % volume lost______________3________5________8_______10____ ___15
    Octane RON_____________98.1_____98.4______98.6_______99__ ___99.5
    Density kg/l 15 deg C_____0.75_____0.76_____0.765______0.78_____0.79
    Equivalent air fuel ratio
    at constant volume_______13:1___12.8:1____12.7:1____12.5:1___1 2.3 :1

    At the end of 5 weeks the fuel is 5% heavier and the fuel air mix will contain more fuel.

    Does Gas Go Bad?Posted: Mar 31, 2008 | By: Eric Peters, AOL Autos8 Comments Print EmailMoreA A A Does gasoline really go "bad" if you leave it unused for a period of time? Some people are convinced this is just another urban legend, and that people who worry about "old gas" and spend money on fuel stabilizer are wasting psychic energy as well as cash.

    But in fact, gasoline can degrade over time. That can lead to a number of problems, ranging from hard starting, to rough running, to no starting at all.

    Here's Why


    Unlike crude oil, gasoline is a highly refined product brewed to a certain chemical composition with very specific characteristics. One characteristic of gas is volatility, a term used to describe how easily and under what conditions the gas vaporizes so it can be efficiently burned in your car's engine.

    The most highly volatile components in gasoline also tend to evaporate over time. As they do, the remaining fuel's volatility and ability to combust properly degrades. The less volatile the fuel, the less effectively it burns in your engine. The result is diminished engine performance. Your engine may still start and run, but it probably won't run as well.

    The good news is, once the old gas has been consumed and the tank is topped off with fresh fuel, the problem should cure itself. Evaporation of volatile compounds can be limited by making sure the gas cap is secured tightly. For the same reason, be sure all portable gas containers are sealed tightly as well.

    A More Serious Problem: Oxidation


    Hydrocarbons in the gas react with oxygen to produce new compounds that eventually change the chemical composition of the fuel. This leads to gum and varnish deposits in the fuel system.

    These deposits and impurities can clog up gas lines and filters, as well the small orifices in a carburetor and the even smaller orifices in a fuel injector. Removing these deposits can be expensive and your vehicle may not run at all or run very poorly until they are removed.

    Water Contamination


    Condensation can form inside your gas tank and lines from heat cycling. Fuels such as E85, which have a high concentration of ethanol alcohol, may be even more susceptible to water contamination, as ethanol likes to draw moisture out of the surrounding air.

    Water contamination can be a problem at gas stations with light traffic due to a slightly different kind of heat cycling. The underground storage tanks experience increases and decreases in temperature. This can cause moisture to form and contaminate the fuel. When you fill up at such a station, you're pumping in the water along with the gas. Such low-traffic stations may also have other contaminants in their underground storage tanks, such as rust. They are best avoided when possible.

    Water, of course, does not work too well as a fuel in an internal combustion engine.

    It will cause hard starting and rough running until it's purged from the system. It can also contribute to internal rusting of the gas lines and tank. The resultant scale and small particles can create a true nightmare, sometimes requiring the replacement of the gas lines and tank at considerable expense.

    You can reduce the chances of water contamination by keeping your car's gas tank as close to full as possible, especially if the vehicle is going to be left idle for an extended period.

    How Do You Identify Bad Gas?


    One way is to eyeball it. Oxidized fuel often turns darker over time and may even smell sour. You can check stored gasoline by pouring some into a clear glass container and comparing it side-by-side with known fresh gasoline. If your old sample looks noticeably darker than the fresh gas, you have strong evidence the gas has gone bad.

    Does Gas Go Bad?Posted: Mar 31, 2008 | By: Eric Peters, AOL Autos8 Comments Print EmailMoreA A A Does gasoline really go "bad" if you leave it unused for a period of time? Some people are convinced this is just another urban legend, and that people who worry about "old gas" and spend money on fuel stabilizer are wasting psychic energy as well as cash.

    But in fact, gasoline can degrade over time. That can lead to a number of problems, ranging from hard starting, to rough running, to no starting at all.

    Here's Why


    Unlike crude oil, gasoline is a highly refined product brewed to a certain chemical composition with very specific characteristics. One characteristic of gas is volatility, a term used to describe how easily and under what conditions the gas vaporizes so it can be efficiently burned in your car's engine.

    The most highly volatile components in gasoline also tend to evaporate over time. As they do, the remaining fuel's volatility and ability to combust properly degrades. The less volatile the fuel, the less effectively it burns in your engine. The result is diminished engine performance. Your engine may still start and run, but it probably won't run as well.

    The good news is, once the old gas has been consumed and the tank is topped off with fresh fuel, the problem should cure itself. Evaporation of volatile compounds can be limited by making sure the gas cap is secured tightly. For the same reason, be sure all portable gas containers are sealed tightly as well.

    A More Serious Problem: Oxidation


    Hydrocarbons in the gas react with oxygen to produce new compounds that eventually change the chemical composition of the fuel. This leads to gum and varnish deposits in the fuel system.

    These deposits and impurities can clog up gas lines and filters, as well the small orifices in a carburetor and the even smaller orifices in a fuel injector. Removing these deposits can be expensive and your vehicle may not run at all or run very poorly until they are removed.

    Water Contamination


    Condensation can form inside your gas tank and lines from heat cycling. Fuels such as E85, which have a high concentration of ethanol alcohol, may be even more susceptible to water contamination, as ethanol likes to draw moisture out of the surrounding air.

    Water contamination can be a problem at gas stations with light traffic due to a slightly different kind of heat cycling. The underground storage tanks experience increases and decreases in temperature. This can cause moisture to form and contaminate the fuel. When you fill up at such a station, you're pumping in the water along with the gas. Such low-traffic stations may also have other contaminants in their underground storage tanks, such as rust. They are best avoided when possible.

    Water, of course, does not work too well as a fuel in an internal combustion engine.

    It will cause hard starting and rough running until it's purged from the system. It can also contribute to internal rusting of the gas lines and tank. The resultant scale and small particles can create a true nightmare, sometimes requiring the replacement of the gas lines and tank at considerable expense.

    You can reduce the chances of water contamination by keeping your car's gas tank as close to full as possible, especially if the vehicle is going to be left idle for an extended period.

    How Do You Identify Bad Gas?


    One way is to eyeball it. Oxidized fuel often turns darker over time and may even smell sour. You can check stored gasoline by pouring some into a clear glass container and comparing it side-by-side with known fresh gasoline. If your old sample looks noticeably darker than the fresh gas, you have strong evidence the gas has gone bad.

    How Long Does it Take for Gas to Go Bad?


    That depends on a number of factors. For one, it's hard to know how old the gas you just bought actually is. It may be fresh from the refinery, or it may be a month old already by the time you top off your tank. Some gasoline is mixed with better or more oxidation inhibitors than others.

    It's a good rule of thumb to avoid leaving gas in your tank or a storage container for more than a coupe of months, if you can avoid it.

    And if You Can't?


    If you know gas will sit in your tank or a storage container for a couple months, then it's a wise move to buy some fuel system stabilizer and mix it in with the gasoline. Do it before you put the vehicle into long-term storage or before leaving your lawn equipment fuel containers sitting for the winter. The stabilizer helps prevent oxidation, the biggie that can turn gas into garbage that gunks up your system and leads to expensive repair work.

    Using fuel system stabilizer for extended storage is preferable to draining the tank and leaving the system dry. This can cause rubber hoses, gaskets and seals to dry-rot and crack, possibly leading to leaks and even a fire. In addition, a dry system can expose the insides of metal fuel lines and your gas tank to air and moisture, which can lead to or accelerate the formation of rust.

    Fuel system stabilizer is not a cure-all and it doesn't last forever. It must be mixed with fresh gas before the vehicle is stored, not added to already old gas. It can slow down the oxidation process and keep gas fresh for as long as 12 to15 months. If you're going to leave the vehicle parked for longer than that, you may want to drain the tank and refill with fresh fuel before returning the vehicle to service.

    For more information on this topic visit:



    That depends on a number of factors. For one, it's hard to know how old the gas you just bought actually is. It may be fresh from the refinery, or it may be a month old already by the time you top off your tank. Some gasoline is mixed with better or more oxidation inhibitors than others.

    It's a good rule of thumb to avoid leaving gas in your tank or a storage container for more than a coupe of months, if you can avoid it.

    And if You Can't?


    If you know gas will sit in your tank or a storage container for a couple months, then it's a wise move to buy some fuel system stabilizer and mix it in with the gasoline. Do it before you put the vehicle into long-term storage or before leaving your lawn equipment fuel containers sitting for the winter. The stabilizer helps prevent oxidation, the biggie that can turn gas into garbage that gunks up your system and leads to expensive repair work.

    Using fuel system stabilizer for extended storage is preferable to draining the tank and leaving the system dry. This can cause rubber hoses, gaskets and seals to dry-rot and crack, possibly leading to leaks and even a fire. In addition, a dry system can expose the insides of metal fuel lines and your gas tank to air and moisture, which can lead to or accelerate the formation of rust.

    Fuel system stabilizer is not a cure-all and it doesn't last forever. It must be mixed with fresh gas before the vehicle is stored, not added to already old gas. It can slow down the oxidation process and keep gas fresh for as long as 12 to15 months. If you're going to leave the vehicle parked for longer than that, you may want to drain the tank and refill with fresh fuel before returning the vehicle to service.

    For more information on this topic visit:

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,749

    Default

    It's my understanding that if you are to leave fuel in the gas tank ,make sure to top it off before doing so, that's what Yamaha recommends.
    I left a full tank of gas in my boat for up to a year once and had absolutley no problems at all. Also I forgot to turn off the battery, but cranked right over.
    If you think you will have problems, just drain the tanks before you store it...pretty simple.
    Good Luck,
    Robert

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