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sky
07-22-2008, 03:43 PM
I heard on the news this morning LakeOroville has 40% water level capacity. The lake has 167 at full water level capacity. The water level has dropped to 40% and now has only about 67 miles of shoreline.


LakeShasta normally has 370 miles of shoreline – it is down to 48% water level capacity or 177 miles of shoreline left….

LakeShasta, the state's largest reservoir, is currently at just 48 percent capacity, department officials said. The next-largest reservoir, LakeOroville -- which sits at the top of the vast system of state pumps and canals that send mountain river supplies to Southern California -- is at 40 percent capacity now and will drop to about 20 percent by the end of December, he said. READ FULL STORY: http://www.my58.com/news/16947726/detail.html (http://www.my58.com/news/16947726/detail.html)

December’s federal court ruling restricting pumping from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, coupled with low reservoir storage and continuing dry weather is causing water supply problems. DWR projects that it will only be able to deliver 35 percent of requested water to State Water Project Contractors this year.

Most water released from Oroville this year will be for local agricultural demand and for environmental quality in the Delta.

2007 was a very dry year, causing Lake Oroville to shrink to under 700 feet elevation and about 36 per cent of storage capacity (currently, it’s at 40 percent of capacity). More snow fell this year than last, but 2008 still qualifies hydrologically as a dry year. This March and April combined are going into the books as among the driest on record.

Even with low water conditions, however, LakeOroville is an attractive recreational lake with an excellent bass fishery. It is also the only reservoir in California where Coho salmon are stocked. Coho are popular with LakeOroville anglers due to their high quality table fare, and superior fighting performance.

Low lake levels this year are not expected to significantly affect the quality of fishing. DWR Fisheries Biologist Eric See said the lake’s size and depth help assure that its fishery remains healthy.

studlyfisherman
07-22-2008, 04:17 PM
f me in the a...that is no bueno

HBJapo
07-22-2008, 04:33 PM
No bueno is correct. This should scare the shite out of everyone. As So Cal needs to become more self sustaining we will need to turn to our own water resources. This will shrink our reservoirs......

Not good. Who's got the dehydrated water?

Japo :Envious:

Koshaw
07-22-2008, 06:36 PM
Instant water...just add water ;)

Not good :(

I thought I heard the snow levels were really quite good this year? I know South Lake got another 4+ feet in February and then got another 2+ feet at the end of May.

Maybe this is just the Eastern Sierras that did that well?

Mike274
07-23-2008, 12:07 AM
Folks have been monitoring the water levels at Oroville for a few years now. They say that fishing should not be affected and in fact should improve as the fish will be forced to concentrate into smaller areas.

Mike

Badfish2
07-27-2008, 11:29 PM
what's crazy is all the lakes on the eastern side are spilling over right now..lake sabrina staff reported they have been spilling over for about a week now

Koshaw
07-28-2008, 01:50 PM
So if only we can transfer the water from the eastern sierras to the west eh?

DarkShadow
07-28-2008, 02:00 PM
They say that fishing should not be affected and in fact should improve as the fish will be forced to concentrate into smaller areas.

Mike

I'd rather have a glass of fresh water to drink, than a concentrated school of spotted bass to chase.

Badfish2
07-30-2008, 04:42 AM
I'd rather have a glass of fresh water to drink, than a concentrated school of spotted bass to chase.

Troof:Cool:

PUDD MASTER BAITER
08-01-2008, 07:34 AM
I stayed with my son in clovis, and fished pineflats lake ,and eastman. Ive never seen the water that low, it was a hike just to get to the water at eastman from the parking lot.

sky
08-01-2008, 06:02 PM
I just saw a photo of pineflat....it is unreal how low the lake is...

Where I was standing to take this photo was where the water level used to be at Lake Morena from when I was able to launch from my campsite. Now the water is about 300 yards away.

http://fishingnetwork.net/forum4/attachment.php?attachmentid=6098&d=1217789142

sky
08-03-2008, 02:44 AM
California is facing the most serious shortage of water crisis in its history. After experiencing the driest spring in recorded history and two years of drought, water reserves are dangerously low. With the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta ecosystem near collapse, court-ordered restrictions on water deliveries from the Delta have reduced supplies from the state's two largest water systems by twenty to thirty percent.

Defining when a drought begins varies by location, and may be based on criteria such as rainfall/runoff, amount of water in storage, or other expected water supplies. Droughts differ from typical emergency events such as floods or forest fires, in that they occur slowly over a multiyear period. Impacts of drought are typically felt first by those most reliant on annual rainfall. Ranchers engaged in dryland grazing, rural residents relying on wells in low-yield rock formations, or small water systems lacking a reliable source. Drought impacts increase with the length of a drought, as carry-over supplies in reservoirs are depleted and water levels in groundwater basins decline.

Statewide rainfall has been below normal in 2007 and 2008, with many Southern California communities receiving only 20 percent of normal rainfall in 2007, and Northern California this year experiencing the driest spring on record with most communities receiving less than 20 percent of normal rainfall from March through May.

The Colorado River Basin has just experienced a record eight-year drought resulting in current reservoir storage throughout the river system reduced to just over 50 percent of total storage capacity. Climate change will increasingly impact California's hydrology and is expected to reduce snow pack, alter the timing of runoff and increase the intensity and frequency of droughts in the western United States.

Dry conditions have created a situation of extreme fire danger in California, and these conditions resulted in devastating fires last year, resulting in proclamations of emergency for the counties of El Dorado, Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, Santa Barbara, Riverside, San Bernardino, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz and San Diego, with wildfires there causing millions of dollars in damages.

The current drought conditions are harming urban and rural economies, and the state's overall economic prosperity. Some communities are restricting new development and mandating water conservation and rationing, and some farmers have idled permanent crops and are not planting seasonal crops this year, because of unreliable or uncertain water supplies.

Recent supply reductions have jeopardized agricultural production in the San Joaquin Valley. It is not possible to predict the duration of present drought conditions. While communities throughout the state have worked to significantly improve their drought preparedness, the readiness to cope with current and future drought conditions varies widely. Immediate water conservation measures are needed this year to address current conditions and prepare for a dry 2009.

California is experiencing critically dry water conditions in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River basins and the statewide runoff forecast for 2008 is estimated to be 41 percent below average. Water storage in many of the reservoirs serving the Central Valley are far below normal including San Luis Reservoir which is at 53 percent of capacity, Lake Shasta at 61 percent of capacity and Lake Oroville at just 50 percent of capacity.

Diversions from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta for the State Water Project (SWP) and federal Central Valley Project (CVP) are being greatly restricted due to various factors including federal court actions to protect fish species, resulting in estimated SWP deliveries of only 35 percent, and CVP deliveries of only 40 percent, of local agencies' requested amounts for 2008.

The United States Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) recently announced an unexpected reduction in its water supply allocations to Central Valley Project (CVP) contractors within the San Luis Delta Mendota Water Agency Service Area from 45 percent to 40 percent. This unanticipated reduction will result in crop loss, increased unemployment and other direct and indirect economic impacts to Central Valley counties.

Water rationing has been ordered by the City of Long Beach, the City of Roseville, and the East Bay Municipal Utility District, which serves 1.3 million people in Alameda and Contra Costa counties. On June 10, 2008, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, which supplies water for 26 cities and water agencies serving 18 million people in six southern California counties, declared a water supply alert in an effort to sustain their water reserves.

Some communities are also restricting new residential and commercial development because of unreliable or uncertain water supplies, and this is causing harm to the economy. The lack of water is causing agricultural workers in the Central Valley to lose their jobs, resulting in a loss of livelihood, an inability to provide for their families, and increased negative social and economic impacts on the communities that depend on them.

The Sierra snowpack is now unrieliable due to global client changes, and the drought condition in the Colorado River Basin is impacting many communities in California with mandatory water restrictions and rising water bills. There could be a diasterous effect on our economy if the drought continues into next year. Dry conditions have created a situation of extreme fire danger in California, and these conditions resulted in devastating fires last year, with wildfires causing millions of dollars in damages.

San Joaquin Valley agriculture constitutes a $20 billion industry, and serves as an essential part of California's economy. The lack of water will cause devastating harm to the communities that rely on this important industry, as growers lack sufficient water to finish the growing season, are forced to abandon planted crops, and are forced to dismiss workers. San Joaquin Valley agricultural production and processing industries account for almost 40 percent of regional employment, and every dollar produced on the farm generates more than three dollars in the local and regional economies, and the loss of these dollars is devastating communities.

Almost 20 percent of San Joaquin Valley residents already live in poverty, and it consistently ranks as the top region in the nation in foreclosures. As workers lose their jobs because of the lack of water, they often move their families away from the communities, resulting in further harm to local economies, lower enrollments in local schools and reduced funding for schools. The city of Fresno received only 54 percent of normal rainfall in 2007 and 76 percent of normal in 2008, and had its fourth driest spring on record.

On June 11, 2008, the Fresno County Board of Supervisors passed a resolution declaring a local state of emergency due to the severe drought conditions, stating among other things that the lack of water has resulted in water rationing by Fresno County water districts.

These reductions are causing abandonment of current planted seasonal crops and permanent crops. The cumulative crop reductions will result in job losses in Fresno County communities. The loss of revenue has negatively impacted Fresno County businesses and Fresno County government tax revenue. There will be a substantial negative economic impact to the community. The Fresno County Board of Supervisors also requested a state of emergency due to the drought conditions.

The Central Valley cities of Bakersfield, Modesto, Stockton, and Sacramento experienced their driest spring on record in 2008, and additional Central Valley counties are experiencing similar emergency conditions caused by drought and lack of water deliveries. To date, almost $65 million in losses have been reported by 19 counties due to reduced rangeland grasses that are used to graze livestock, and those reductions have been caused by drought.

Statewide and local conditions collectively have led to the rationing of water by affected water districts to their member farmers and these further reductions are resulting in abandonment of current planted seasonal crops and permanent crops. The crop losses will cause increased food prices, which will negatively impact families and economies throughout California and beyond our borders.

The lack of water deliveries has forced local communities to draw water from their emergency water reserves, putting communities at risk of further catastrophe if emergency reserves are depleted or cut off. The circumstances of the severe drought conditions, by reason of their magnitude, are beyond the control of the services, personnel, equipment and facilities of any single county, city and county, or city and require the combined forces of a mutual aid region or regions to combat.

The conditions of extreme peril to the safety of persons and property exist within the counties of Sacramento, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Merced, Madera, Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Kern, caused by the current and continuing severe drought conditions. The Governor of California proclaimed a state of emergency within the counties of Sacramento, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Merced, Madera, Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Kern.

On June 4th 2008, Governor of California, Arnold Schwarzenegger, issued an executive order proclaiming a statewide drought. He also issued a Central Valley State of Emergency Proclamation for nine Central Valley counties (Sacramento, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Merced, Madera, Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Kern) to address urgent water needs. The State of California is committed to enhancing drought response and drought preparedness and to protecting the state's economy and its environment.

In an effort to protect the people and property of California, including the businesses, workers and communities that depend on water deliveries for their livelihood and survival, Governor Schwarzenegger called on all Californians to conserve water, and he directed state agencies and departments to take immediate action to address the serious drought conditions and water delivery reductions that exist in California.

Badfish2
08-03-2008, 10:36 PM
Get the info from the source...

http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/reservoirs/RES

Looks like water is mostly at average (look at % of average) ..but there are some lakes/resevoirs that are below.

sky
08-04-2008, 02:10 AM
Get the info from the source...

http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/reservoirs/RES

Looks like water is mostly at average (look at % of average) ..but there are some lakes/resevoirs that are below.

Badfish, I think you must have misread the information on the link above - which actually shows the severity of the situation I discussed in my email above. The lakes in red in the column below I looked up the miles of shoreline at full water level capacity. The first number on the lefthand side correlates to the % of water capacity the lake is presently at, as indicated on the web site link above you provided.

The second number is the MILES OF SHORELINE when the lake is at full water level capacity, which I looked up in a book, and the last number is the % of miles of shoreline the lake presently has. Example: Trintiy lake: 57-145=82 57% water level capacity, 145 miles of shoreline when at full water level capacity, 82 miles of shoreline presently. WOW that massive lake is disappearing! The same with Lake Shasta, and Lake Oroville. (SCROLL ALL OF THE WAY TO THE BOTTOM TO VIEW LIST.)

Based on the list below, which is from the link you referred to in your email above, - (which contains a majority of the largest lakes located in California- with the exception of Lake Berryessa, clear lake, eagle lake, mono lake, and a couple of others), 50% of the state of California is in a severe drought condition. AND the majority of the largest lakes in the State of California are at severe low water levels.

Out of the list below, 23 lakes out of the 33 lakes listed, (which contain the majority of the largest lakes and reservoirs in California), are at dangerously low water levels. All it is going to take is one more year of drought conditions to have huge, and I mean huge effects on the people living in California.

I don't know how much more of a wakeup call people need to realize if we don't start conserving our water - we could easily be out of water if we have another drought next year. People need to take shorter showers, only wash their car once a month, water there lawns only a couple times a week, for less duration. Shut off the water in the sink, when you aren't using it. Don't use the dish washer until it is full....etc.

A number of water agencies have already begun to make restrictions in a number of counties in the state of california. Read the link below to get an idea of where we are heading...

http://www.acwa.com/issues/drought2008/water_supply_conditions.asp

Based on the chart below close to half of the state is presently in severe drought conditions. What more of a wakeup call do we need? To wait until we turn on the spicket and no water comes out???? We can all stick our head in the sand and hope the stiuation disappears, but the only thing that may disappear in this case, is our water. I had no idea how bad the situation is.

http://drought.unl.edu/dm/pics/ca_dm.png

http://www.californiagcsa.org/enviro.htm Executive order declared by the California Governor due to severe drought conditions.
http://gov.ca.gov/issue/disaster-preparedness/ State of Emergency for Central Valley Region's Severe Water Shortages


EXECUTIVE ORDER S-06-08
WHEREAS Statewide rainfall has been below normal in 2007 and 2008, with many Southern California communities receiving only 20 percent of normal rainfall in 2007, and Northern California this year experiencing the driest spring on record with most communities receiving less than 20 percent of normal rainfall from March through May; and

WHEREAS California is experiencing critically dry water conditions in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River basins and the statewide runoff forecast for 2008 is estimated to be 41 percent below average; and
WHEREAS water storage in many of the state's major reservoirs is far below normal including Lake Oroville, which supplies the State Water Project, at 50 percent of capacity, Lake Shasta at 61 percent of capacity and Folsom Lake at 63 percent of capacity; and

WHEREAS the Colorado River Basin has just experienced a record eight-year drought resulting in current reservoir storage throughout the river system reduced to just over 50 percent of total storage capacity; and
WHEREAS climate change will increasingly impact California's hydrology and is expected to reduce snowpack, alter the timing of runoff and increase the intensity and frequency of droughts in the western United States; and

WHEREAS diversions from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta for the State Water Project (SWP) and federal Central Valley Project (CVP) are being greatly restricted due to various factors including federal court actions to protect fish species, resulting in estimated SWP deliveries of only 35 percent, and CVP deliveries of only 40 percent, of local agencies' requested amounts for 2008; and

WHEREAS dry conditions have created a situation of extreme fire danger in California, and these conditions resulted in devastating fires last year, resulting in proclamations of emergency for the counties of El Dorado, Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, Santa Barbara, Riverside, San Bernardino, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz and San Diego, with wildfires there causing millions of dollars in damages; and

WHEREAS on May 9, 2008, I signed an Executive Order directing various agencies and departments within my administration to respond to these dry conditions and prepare for another potentially severe wildfire season; and

WHEREAS the current drought conditions are harming urban and rural economies, and the state's overall economic prosperity; and
WHEREAS some communities are restricting new development and mandating water conservation and rationing, and some farmers have idled permanent crops and are not planting seasonal crops this year, because of unreliable or uncertain water supplies; and

WHEREAS recent supply reductions have jeopardized agricultural production in the San Joaquin Valley; an

WHEREAS it is not possible to predict the duration of present drought conditions; and

WHEREAS while communities throughout the state have worked to significantly improve their drought preparedness, the readiness to cope with current and future drought conditions varies widely; and

WHEREAS immediate water conservation measures are needed this year to address current conditions and prepare for a dry 2009; and

WHEREAS the State of California is committed to enhancing drought response and drought preparedness and to protecting the state's economy and its environment

NOW, THEREFORE, I, ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor of the State of California, do hereby proclaim a condition of statewide drought, and in accordance with the authority vested in me by the Constitution and statutes of the State of California, do hereby issue the following orders to become effective immediately

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that the Department of Water Resources (DWR) shall take immediate action to address the serious drought conditions and water delivery limitations that currently exist in California, and that are anticipated in the future, by taking the following actions:
Expedite existing grant programs for local water districts and agencies for new or ongoing water conservation and water use reduction programs and projects that are capable of timely implementation to ease drought conditions in 2008 or 2009.

Facilitate water transfers in 2008 to timely respond to potential emergency water shortages and water quality degradation, and prepare to operate a dry year water purchasing program in 2009.

In cooperation with local water agencies and other water-related organizations, conduct an aggressive water conservation and outreach campaign.

Immediately convene the Climate Variability Advisory Committee to prioritize and expedite drought-related climate research that will assist in responding to current drought conditions and help prepare for a potentially dry 2009.

Provide technical assistance for drought response to local water agencies and districts for improving landscape and agricultural irrigation efficiencies, leak detection and other measures as appropriate.
Review the water shortage contingency elements of Urban Water Management Plans and work cooperatively with water suppliers to implement improvements.

Coordinate and implement State Water Project operations and water exchanges to alleviate critical impacts to San Joaquin Valley agriculture.
Implement additional actions to facilitate drought response, preparedness and promote water conservation in 2008 and 2009, and which will contribute to achieving long term reductions in water use.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that DWR and the Department of Public Health (DPH) prioritize processing of loan and grant contracts for water suppliers and public water systems demonstrating drought-related hardships.


IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that DWR and DPH coordinate with the State Office of Emergency Services and local offices of emergency services to identify public water systems at risk of experiencing health and safety impacts due to drought conditions and water delivery limitations, and to mitigate such impacts.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that DWR and DPH work with local water districts to evaluate system interconnections among the state's large water purveyors, review the status or availability of mutual aid agreements among those large water purveyors, and work with the parties to those mutual aid agreements to correct any deficiencies that restrict the movement of water in an emergency situation

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that DWR coordinate with the California Public Utilities Commission to identify investor-owned water utility systems at risk of experiencing health and safety impacts due to drought conditions and water delivery limitations, and to mitigate such impacts.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that DWR work with the Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA), the United States Department of Agriculture and the United States Bureau of Reclamation to identify potential federal funding for local water agencies and farmers to facilitate the rapid installation of best available irrigation management and conservation systems.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the CDFA work with county Agricultural Commissioners and others as necessary to identify and gather data on crop losses and other adverse economic impacts caused by the drought and, when necessary, transmit that information to the appropriate federal and state agencies.

IT IS FURTHER STRONGLY ENCOURAGED that local water agencies and districts work cooperatively on the regional and state level to take aggressive, immediate action to reduce water consumption locally and regionally for the remainder of 2008 and prepare for potential worsening water conditions in 2009.

This Order is not intended to, and does not, create any rights or benefits, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity, against the State of California, its agencies, departments, entities, officers, employees, or any other person.

I FURTHER DIRECT that as soon as hereafter possible, this Executive Order be filed in the Office of the Secretary of State and that widespread publicity and notice be given to this Executive Order.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Great Seal of the State of California to be affixed this 4th day of June 2008.
________________________________ ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER
Governor of California
ATTEST:
________________________________
DEBRA BOWEN
Secretary of State
In the Column
% of Water Capacity
TRINITYLAKE


57 -145=82

WHISKEYTOWN


99

LEWISTON


95



RUSSIANRIVER

SONOMA(WARM SPRINGS)


57

MENDOCINO (COYOTE)


47



SACRAMENTO RIVER

SHASTA


41-370=151

KESWICK


94



FEATHERRIVER

OROVILLE


36-167=60

ANTELOPE


77-14=10

FRENCHMAN


----

LAKEDAVIS


53-28=15



YUBARIVER

BULLARDS BAR


66-40=26

ENGLEBRIGHT


92



AMERICANRIVER

FOLSOM


35-54=19

NIMBUS


93



STONY CREEK

BLACK BUTTE


42-30=13



CALAVERASRIVER

NEW HOGAN


35-48=17



MOKELUMNERIVER

CAMANCHE


36-40=15

PARDEE


92



STANISLAUSRIVER

DONNELL'S


87

BEARDSLEY


69

TULLOCH


97

NEW MELONES


50-100=50



TUOLUMNERIVER

HETCH HETCHY


----

DON PEDRO


----



MERCED RIVER

MC CLURE (EXCHEQUER)


37-70=26



CHOWCHILLARIVER

EASTMAN (BUCHANAN)


11-13=2



FRESNORIVER

HENSLEY (HIDDEN)


11-16=2



SAN JOAQUINRIVER

MILLERTON (FRIANT)


41-41=17



SANLUISCREEK

SAN LUIS


20-40=8



KINGSRIVER

PINE FLAT


18-35=6



KAWEAHRIVER

KAWEAH (TERMINUS)


18-20=4



TULERIVER

SUCCESS


9-17=2



KERNRIVER

ISABELLA


35-32=11



SOUTHCOAST

PYRAMID


96

CASTAIC


94